A Toledoan is facing charges of drag racing and fleeing and eluding police in connection with two Dodge Challengers that were clocked at speeds up to 180 mph on southbound I-75 near Sigler Rd.

With fewer vehicles on the roads, it might be tempting to speed it up a little.

For two drivers, that “little” was 180 mph on I-75.

One of the drivers, a Toledoan, is facing charges of drag racing and fleeing and eluding police in connection with two Dodge Challengers that were clocked at speeds up to 180 mph on southbound I-75 near Sigler Rd. in Berlin Township April 19.

According to the Monroe County Sheriff’s Office, which assisted in the incident, a Michigan State Police trooper recorded the speeding about 11:40 p.m. while he was stopped along the freeway. The trooper followed the two vehicles while radioing for assistance.

Two deputies responded to southbound I-75 at the LaPlaisance Rd. entrance and joined in the pursuit to just south of the Erie Rd. exit, where the chase ended.

The driver of a black 2016 Challenger was cited by state police on a charge of driving 180 in a 70 mph zone and released from custody, deputies said.

The driver of the second vehicle also may face charges. The second vehicle, which may have been stolen, was impounded by Toledo police, deputies said.

The ticket, a redacted version which MSP posted to Twitter but later removed out of concern for identifying the driver, showed the first motorist apologized for speeding.

“My fault I was speeding with another (sic) vehicle,” a remark on the ticket stated. “Sorry.”

The fine for speeding more than 25 mph over the speed limit, in this case, amounts to a dollar per mile per hour at $180, according to a schedule of fines listed on the Monroe County website.

It's just one example of an increase in high-speed driving amid the novel coronavirus pandemic, said state police First District Lt. Brian Oleksyk. Still, in more than 19 years of work, the fastest speedster he's seen went about 130 or 137 mph.

Though police are limiting traffic stops right now out of concern for the spread of COVID-19, troopers are forced to make a stop when someone goes that fast, Oleksyk said. The driver puts themselves, everybody else on the road, and the officer trying to make the stop in danger, he said.

"If there was a crash, to me, there's only one outcome at that high of speeds, and that's death," he said.

“MSP wants people to know, just because there is less traffic on the roads and warmer weather, there is no excuse for speeding,” said Monroe post commander 1st Lt. Greg Morenko.

The Detroit Free Press contributed to this report.